New five-county program in NC is focused on rounding up feral swine

by Heather Overton


A new pilot program that loans feral swine traps to individuals in a five-county area of North Carolina hopes to make an impact in reducing these destructive pests. The traps, which can be borrowed for up to a month, include a remote trigger system that allows an operator to monitor the trap with a smartphone in real time and close the gate when the entire group of pigs is inside.




Key takeaway points include:


– The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission have been working to reduce the population of feral swine.


– Feral swine root and wallow, destroying food crops, polluting waterways and devastating natural areas as they move around.


– A new five-county pilot program involving loaner traps hopes to make significant inroads on their numbers in these counties.


– Under the program, landowners in Anson, Davie, Haywood, Montgomery and Randolph counties can borrow a high-tech corral trap for up to a month for free.


– These traps include a remote trigger system that allows an operator to monitor it with a smartphone in real time and close the gate when the entire group of pigs is inside.


– Program participants are responsible for baiting and monitoring the trap and disposing of pigs that are captured. Assistance with disposal can be requested.


– By law, feral swine may not be released alive from any trap.


– The corrals are designed to capture groups of swine to more effectively reduce their numbers. While some landowners may be able to successfully remove one or two at a time, a pregnant sow can have as many as a dozen piglets in one litter.


– Because they reproduce so quickly, you have to focus on how many are missed and left to multiply.


– Corralling groups of feral swine should be more effective.


– You can find more information on the trap loan program online at ncferalswine.org.


– The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is asking people to report feral swine sightings, harvests and damage. You can also find a link to the reporting form at ncferalswine.org.


– Collecting this information is important as it helps develop resources and guide future management efforts.

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